Bank Frauds in the News – $43 Trillion Financial Fraud Lawsuit in US – Racketeering and Money Laundering

Iceland dealt with it’s banking and financial problems and the economy is recovering.  The Irish are taking mass action against the banks. Even the US have started civil lawsuits against racketeering and Money Laundering now – but they’re trying to keep it quiet.

Censored: Banks Fraud in the News – $43 Trillion Financial Fraud Lawsuit and CNBC Executive’s Children Murdered – coincidence or not!?

Do you watch/read the news? Do you believe it isn’t censored…?
In that case you will have heard one of the big CNBC related news stories.

Not the one about the Vice President of CNBC Digital having his children murdered, which is the daily fodder of stories that media like to feed people that enjoy this kind of curious behaviour. Even though it was horrific and not deserving of anyone, especially young children: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2223972/Krim-murder-Brave-year-old-girl-tried-fight-killer-nanny.html

But the other BIG story I’m referring to is about the $43 trillion dollar lawsuit that CNBC had published earlier that same day.  It was a Press Release that they had run on their website, I know it was there as I had a glance last week and saved the link to read later. CNBC Published the article on Thursday and it had disappeared within 48 hours! Now who says news isn’t censored!?

This is the link where the article WAS:
http://www.cnbc.com/id/49555671/Major_Banks_Governmental_Officials_and_Their_Comrade_Capitalists_Targets_of_Spire_Law_Group_LLP_s_Racketeering_and_Money_Laundering_Lawsuit_Seeking_Return_of_43_Trillion_to_the_United_States_Treasury

A copy of the deleted article/press release is available here to read:
http://www.scribd.com/doc/111797302

View the 858 Page Lawsuit here:
http://www.scribd.com/doc/111799801

And other people that notice the anomaly and discussing the coincidence:
http://wtfrly.com/2012/10/27/cnbc-curiously-removes-article-on-43-trillion-financial-fraud-lawsuit-after-executives-kids-murdered-in-new-york-nanny-case/

I’m not saying there is a link but don’t you think it curious that it happened!?

—–

Elsewhere in the World….

Do what Iceland did and kick out the corrupt Government plebs and fraudulent bankers!

The Irish have also started their cases

Bankers in America know their time has come with the latest lawsuit and it looks like it will be the UK’s biggest next, with Lloyds TSB management and their Halifax Bank of Scotland partners next.

Do you think your Bank has defrauded you?

Well, with so much overwhelming evidence (or lack of defence offered), moral and financial bankruptcy, government bailouts, whilst they take money from ‘Dear Doris’ – the answer is yes and you can find out easily by asking them a few simple questions.

Of course if you’re happy with them defrauding you, then carry on as normal. After all is Ignorance is Bliss!

If you want to know for sure then you can send them a letter requesting a certified copy of your supposed contracts and proof of Bank funds, to confirm your suspicions.

Your only obligation to yourself is to send the letter, see what answers you get back – then follow up with legal action (if you can afford) or at least publish the information online if there is something untoward or shady about any misdirection and refusal to provide answers or documents that you have a right to!

Yes that’s right – Banks refuse to send documents either because they don’t have them or because they believe they can get away with it. Is it time you showed them that people aren’t going to take any more fraud and lies?

Isn’t it time you took a stand too?

Leave a comment below and I’ll send you a copy of the letter to find out if you have been taken for a ride.

Lloyds (HBOS) Gambled and Lost – Next Centre Point London

Find out where the Banks gambled your money and what they’re doing to get some of it back at the cost to other businesses and people! Do you trust your countries Bankers to be HONEST?


11 October 2010: Trust me I’m a banker
By Mark Daly BBC Scotland Investigations Correspondent (Full story: http://www.bbc.co.uk)

Two years ago this week, Scotland’s once-proud banking history was ripped to shreds.

Facing total ruin, Royal Bank of Scotland was rescued by the government. Halifax Bank of Scotland had to be sold off to Lloyds, which in turn had to be bailed out by the taxpayer.

In 2009, RBS paid £1.3bn in bonuses, while Lloyds paid a reported £200m. Both were in the red at the time

We wanted to know more. Remember, RBS is 83% owned by the taxpayer, Lloyds 41% – so it could be argued that we’re entitled to know what they’re up to.

“Bankers are paid much more than executives in any other walk of business life. The idea that you have to pay these people stratospheric sums of money…underwritten by the taxpayer is offensive.” – Economist Will Hutton

“Just remember one thing, the City is full of greedy, ruthless, clever people and they will do what they can to line their pockets with no regard of the impact it has on society.” – Former trader and best selling author of “Cityboy” Geraint Anderson

Mr Tate, who was the highest earning Lloyds director last year with £1.8m, said: “There are a whole lot of people, myself included, who would love to get the kind of return on their investment that the taxpayer has made into this bank. They’ve made an investment that is making money. If you could come up with me, with an investment in the infrastructure which would have returned more for the taxpayers, I’m all ears.”

(What a Banker!)


    m resort las vegas hbos

Tuesday 12 October 2010: HBOS loses millions on Vegas casino
(Full Story: www.guardian.co.uk)

Value of state-owned Lloyds’ overseas portfolio questioned after Penn National Gaming paid $230m for $860m debt

Penn National Gaming paid $230.5m for around $860m owed to HBOS, which included $700m the bank loaned to M Resort Photograph: Alise O’Brien

Lloyds Banking Group, the partially state-owned lender, has lost more than $500m (£317m) on loans to M Resort Spa Casino in Las Vegas – the second massive financial hit the bank has taken in America in as many months.

News of the deal has started attracting attention to the value of Lloyds’s overseas portfolio, much of which it acquired during the unpopular takeover of HBOS is 2008. Market watchers had previously attributed most of the woe associated with that acquisition to lending within HBOS’s UK corporate division, headed by Peter Cummings.

Penn National Gaming, a US gambling group, paid $230.5m for about $860m owed to HBOS International, which included $700m the bank loaned to M Resort plus another $160m loan that HBOS had acquired from MGM Resorts at an undisclosed price.

The debt sale comes two months after it emerged that HBOS International was set to lose “tens of millions of pounds” from dealings with another US client, Sea Island, the exclusive Georgia holiday retreat that filed for bankruptcy in August. In that case, court documents said Sea Island was unable to pay back close to $600m in debts owed to a consortium of banks that included HBOS, which were taken out to fund an ambitious expansion plan. The company said it planned to sell its coastal resorts to investment funds Oaktree Capital Management and Avenue Capital Group in a $197.5m.

The mounting US losses at HBOS are thought to have been incurred in the division previously run by Colin Matthew, a former HBOS board member whose responsibilities included the bank’s international business. He retired from the newly formed group in January 2009 with a pension entitlement of £416,000 a year, having been paid £652,000 in 2008 and £905,000 in 2007.

Lloyds declined to comment on individual impairments, although the group is thought to have already written down the value of the M Resort loans. Following the sale of HBOS to Lloyds, the former HBOS international and UK corporate businesses have all been rolled into a single Lloyds division, making it difficult to analyse where the major losses have been incurred.

One analyst said: “There is an idea that much of the financial crisis was down to a few bad apples. That is a simplification. It has lots to do with the organisational structure of banks. People are not incentivised to sit back and call the cycle.”

Lloyds has been winding down or selling HBOS-owned assets ever since acquiring Britain’s largest mortgage lender. The acquisition, which was encouraged by the UK government, helped Lloyds book losses of £6.3bn last year and pushed the shares, which closed yesterday at 72.65p, down to 19p.


Towering problems: Centre Point in London13th October 2010: High Court reprieve for Centre Point owner in survival battle with Lloyds banking
(Full Story: www.dailymail.co.uk)

The owner of the Centre Point tower in London won a reprieve in its battle for survival with Lloyds Banking Group. London’s High Court granted Targetfollow two weeks to secure investment, despite efforts by Lloyds to force it into administration over £700million of debt. The property developer cannot meet repayments on the loan or repay it in full because the value of its estate tumbled in the financial crisis.

But the group claims it has come up with a number of viable ways to restructure the debt – only to see them rejected by Lloyds.

The part-nationalised bank, 41per cent owned by the taxpayer after a multi-billion pound bailout by the state, wants to seize and sell the properties to recoup some of its money.


It has raised fears within the commercial property industry of a fire-sale of assets and double-dip in prices as banks seeking to unwind toxic loans handed out during the boom years from undermining the recovery.

Lloyds and Royal Bank of Scotland, which is 84 per cent owned by the state, are sitting on more than a third of the £250billion of outstanding UK property debt.

Many of the rotten loans at Lloyds were approved by Peter Cummings, the former corporate chief of Bank of Scotland, which Lloyds acquired by it bought HBOS in 2008.

‘Every week that passes is detrimental to the value of the assets,’ he said. Lloyds values Targetfollow’s estate at just £450million. The company claims it is worth nearer £680million.

The judge adjourned the case until October 25 at the earliest.

Naghshineh, an Iranian businessman, last month said: ‘The whole UK property industry is watching the situation very closely.

‘Any indication that [Lloyds] is starting a process of offloading [assets] at fire-sale prices will hit the property market very hard indeed, just as the recovery is underway.’


Friday 22 October 2010: Lloyds to go ahead with administration of Centre Point owner Targetfollow
(Full Story – http://uk.finance.yahoo.com)

Lloyds Banking Group is preparing to push ahead with administration proceedings against the owner of London landmark Centre Point despite the company claiming it has secured a £150m rescue cash investment.

Targetfollow, led by founder Ardeshir Naghshineh, issued a statement yesterday saying it had agreed terms with a “high-quality institutional consortium” to invest £150m in the business.

However, according to sources close to talks, Lloyds, which is owed more than £700m by Targetfollow, does not support the proposals and still plans to go ahead with a High Court hearing next week about whether the property company is placed into administration.

Targetfollow is breaching covenants on its debts and Lloyds must approve any capital injection, however it is understood that the bank believes the consortium’s terms are “not feasible” and would require it to take writedowns. The offer is a “long way” from what the bank considers appropriate, sources said. Lloyds declined to comment.

Targetfollow is due in court next week after it was granted two weeks to find a rescue investor earlier this month.

The consortium’s proposed £150m aid package would be used to acquire a portion of the debt from Lloyds and to provide working capital to Targetfollow. Mr Naghshineh said: “I believe that this consortium addresses the issues that the bank has raised with the company in the past 12 months, and will pave the way for the bank and the company to move on from what has been a very difficult time.”

Lloyds is managing about £30bn of problem property debt. The downturn in the sector led to the bank making damaging writedowns during the financial crisis. Latest accounts from Uberior Ventures, HBOS’s property joint venture arm, show its investments fell in value by £590m to £345m last year.


Illegal Tender from the Bank of Scotland?

Not only are all the Banks printing money and ripping off the people of the World, the Banks of Scotland have the audacity to go one further and keep printing and issuing illegal currency – that does not have to be accepted as payment for a debt! (you may if you choose but that is up to you). Does that not make it counterfeiting and worthless?

Read the info below sourced from Wikipedia and a big thanks to the Drummond’s of Alloa (who I met at the Robert Kiyosaki Rich Dad weekend) confirming what I thought.

Bobby

So as a Bank, you’re only allowed to steal if you’re a thief and the government authorises it. If they don’t? Then steal anyway as no-one expects any more from you!

UPDATE: Even though they say it is not Legal, the Bank and Lawyer spin doctors say it is ‘not illegal’ either!? Leave it to banks and lawyers to contradict themselves, then expect us to trust them {joke}


HM Treasury is responsible for defining which notes have ‘legal tender’ status within the United Kingdom and the following extract from Bank of England’s website may help to clarify what is meant by “legal tender” and how little practical meaning the phrase has in everyday transactions.

“The term legal tender does not in itself govern the acceptability of banknotes in transactions. Whether or not notes have legal tender status, their acceptability as a means of payment is essentially a matter for agreement between the parties involved. Legal tender has a very narrow technical meaning in relation to the settlement of debt. If a debtor pays in legal tender the exact amount he owes under the terms of a contract, he has good defence in law if he is subsequently sued for non-payment of the debt. In ordinary everyday transactions, the term ‘legal tender’ has very little practical application.”

Source: www.bankofengland.co.uk/banknotes/about/faqs.htm

And for Legal Tender?

What is the Bank’s “Promise to Pay”?

“The words “I promise to pay the bearer on demand the sum of five [ten/twenty/fifty] pounds” date from long ago when our notes represented deposits of gold. At that time, a member of the public could exchange one of our banknotes for gold to the same value. For example, a £5 note could be exchanged for five gold coins, called sovereigns. But the value of the pound has not been linked to gold for many years, so the meaning of the promise to pay has changed. Exchange into gold is no longer possible and Bank of England notes can only be exchanged for other Bank of England notes of the same face value. Public trust in the pound is now maintained by the operation of monetary policy, the objective of which is price stability.”

Yes that’s right – all the banks do is offer to swap your worthless paper for even more paper as long as you continue to TRUST them!

It’s a Mad, Mad World banking system! << an earlier post I wrote about the banks and trust.


The following is from Wikipedia:

Scottish and Northern Irish banknotes are unusual, firstly because they are issued by retail banks, not central banks, and secondly, as they are not legal tender anywhere in the UK – not even in Scotland or Northern Ireland – they are in fact promissory notes. Indeed, no banknotes (even Bank of England notes) are now legal tender in Scotland or Northern Ireland.

Seven retail banks have the authority of Parliament to issue sterling banknotes as currency. Despite this, the notes are sometimes refused in England and Wales, and are not always accepted by banks and exchange bureaus outside of the United Kingdom. This is particularly true in the case of the Royal Bank of Scotland £1 note, which is the only £1 note to remain in circulation within the UK.

In 2000, the European Central Bank indicated that, should the United Kingdom join the euro, Scottish banks (and, by extension, Northern Ireland banks) would have to cease banknote issue. During the Financial crisis of 2007–2008, the future of private banknotes in the United Kingdom was uncertain. It has been suggested that the Banking Act 2009 would restrict the issue of banknotes by commercial banks in Scotland and Northern Ireland by removing many of the provisions of the Acts quoted above. Banks would be forced to lodge sterling funds with the Bank of England to cover private note issue for a full week, rather than over a weekend, thereby losing four days’ interest and making banknote production financially unviable. Following negotiations among the UK Treasury, the Bank of England and the Scottish banks, it was agreed that the funds would earn interest, allowing them to continue to issue their own notes.

Following the announcement that HBOS (Bank of Scotland’s parent company) would be taken over by Lloyds TSB in September 2008, it was confirmed that the new banking company would continue to print bank notes under the Bank of Scotland name. According to the 1845 Bank Notes (Scotland) Act, the bank could have lost its note-issuing rights, but by retaining headquarters within Scotland, banknote issue will continue.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org


Banks, Solicitors, Receivers, Ex-Tenants

What do you do when banks, government and dishonest people are busy trying to bend you over and screw you in the ass? Take a stand and say NO!

Then see what happens when the hunters become the hunted as I think it’s time to declare that Fair Hunting season is now Open!

It has been an interesting year so far. I’ve had challenges with tyrannical banks (as they are technically bankrupt!) their Nazi solicitors who don’t stand for justice or what is right, only doing as the ‘system’ says – and Receivers claiming to represent individuals on false pretenses and with a lack of loyalty to the person they owe the care and duty.

  • If you have issues with the Bank of Scotland, Bank Receivers, Bank Solicitors and want to share your experiences and information – then contact me now. Experience and knowledge shared will show who is acting honourably and what you can do in such circumstances when the system judges you guilty before being given a fair trial. You are also welcome to repost this information on any other forum with a link back to here.

Let’s not forget the two ex-tenants with outstanding rent; when asked to confirm how much they had paid and to settle the difference, they decided to make a spurious counter-claim instead. Why provide the info and claim fault when you can lie and see how much you can make – blame those where there’s blame (sic), there’s a claim ads and lawyers. The crazy thing is that the individuals in question are the prime suspects in a criminal investigation for vandalism, upset with the Court Summons they smashed a window where they thought my office was – the CCTV and new cameras came in handy eventually. There is such a thing as justice, no matter how or when it is delivered.

Then to finish off, a property that had been turned into a drug den that was then trashed by the police as well and is now being cleaned up (I’ve never seen guys that happy as they cleared rubbish, must be something in the spring air). So at least someone has been happy this month.

  • Should any of the cases not be dealt with satisfactorily, then All documents and communication with banks, courts, tenants etc. will be made available public record along with names of individuals, addresses and proven facts to prevent this happening to other people. 

 If you’re prepared to say or do anything then be prepared to stand by it – as your future depends on your reputation and the world is getting smaller (and some of you reading will be getting worried if I’m talking about you!)  You don’t mess with someone with nothing to lose, so what’s your loss/gain risk ratio?

With Banks not being sympathetic to customers or wanting to help, whilst milking every penny that they can. Having received the taxpayers money from the government they want even more back from the people as well – how many times over do they want us to pay money on fake debts?  Whilst those in Government are fighting over who gets to take and spend more of our money in the future (maybe we should give the Liberal Democrats a try, as they don’t have a track record in screwing citizens and people over, yet!)

Who stands a chance to win against fictional corporations, legal systems and liars? Well the honest souls who do what is right and tell the truth of course. After all, words are powerful and the truth rings true, as opposed to the hollow sound that a fraudulent story makes. Bring it on… 

[Rant over]